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Exposure to Neighborhood Foreclosures and Changes in Cardiometabolic Health: Results From MESA.

Christine, Paul J; Moore, Kari; Crawford, Natalie D; Barrientos-Gutierrez, Tonatiuh; Sánchez, Brisa N; Seeman, Teresa; Diez Roux, Ana V.
Am J Epidemiol; 185(2): 106-114, 2017 01 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27986705
Home foreclosures can precipitate declines in health among the individuals who lost their homes. Whether home foreclosures can "spillover" to affect the health of other neighborhood residents is largely unknown. Using longitudinal data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis that were linked to foreclosure data from 2005 to 2012, we assessed whether greater exposure to neighborhood foreclosures was associated with temporal changes in 3 objectively measured cardiometabolic risk factors: body mass index, systolic blood pressure, and fasting glucose level. We used fixed-effects models to estimate mean changes in cardiometabolic risk factors associated with changes in neighborhood foreclosures over time. In models in which we controlled for time-varying income, working status, medication use, neighborhood poverty, neighborhood unemployment, and interactions of age, sex, race, and state foreclosure laws with time, a standard-deviation increase in neighborhood foreclosures (1.9 foreclosures per quarter mile) was associated with increases in fasting glucose (mean = 0.22 mg/dL, 95% confidence interval: -0.05, 0.50) and decreases in blood pressure (mean = -0.27 mm Hg, 95% confidence interval: -0.49, -0.04). Changes in neighborhood foreclosure rates were not associated with changes in body mass index. Overall, greater exposure to neighborhood foreclosures had mixed associations with cardiometabolic risk factors over time. Given the millions of mortgages still in default, further research clarifying the potential health effects of neighborhood foreclosures is needed.
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