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Software-based evaluation of human attractiveness: a pilot study.

Patzelt, Sebastian B M; Schaible, Leonie K; Stampf, Susanne; Kohal, Ralf J.
J Prosthet Dent; 112(5): 1176-81, 2014 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25218031
STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: The difficulty of evaluating esthetics in an unbiased way may be overcome by using automated software applications.

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to assess the use of a smartphone application as an objective tool for evaluating attractiveness and to evaluate its potential in dentistry.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

Ten white participants (mean age ±SD, 42.1 ±22.6 years) were randomly chosen, and frontal facial pictures of each participant were made. The smartphone application PhotoGenic was used to evaluate the attractiveness of the participants. For comparison, 100 randomly (age>16 years, social environment of the research team) selected raters were asked to evaluate the same participants. The influence of participants' facial expression, age, and sex as well as the raters' age, sex, and occupation was investigated. Statistical analyses (linear mixed models with random intercepts; least square means, 95% confidence interval; P<.05) were implemented.

RESULTS:

PhotoGenic produced a mean ±SD attractiveness score of 6.4 ±1.2 and the rater group of 4.9 ±1.8 (P<.001; score range, 0-10). Female raters tended to slightly higher attractiveness scores. The participants' sex, facial expression, and age seemed to not be of high relevance; however, the raters' sex and occupation had an impact on the evaluation.

CONCLUSION:

PhotoGenic rated the participants' attractiveness with higher scores (more attractive) than did the human raters. Currently, PhotoGenic is not used as an objective evaluation tool for treatment outcomes for dental treatments because the visibility of the teeth (smiling facial expression) has no influence on the evaluation.
Selo DaSilva