Your browser doesn't support javascript.

Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde

Brasil

Home > Pesquisa > ()
Imprimir Exportar

Formato de exportação:

Exportar

Email
Adicionar mais destinatários
| |

IRF5 haplotypes demonstrate diverse serological associations which predict serum interferon alpha activity and explain the majority of the genetic association with systemic lupus erythematosus.

Niewold, Timothy B; Kelly, Jennifer A; Kariuki, Silvia N; Franek, Beverly S; Kumar, Akaash A; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Thomas, Kenaz; Walker, Daniel; Kamp, Stan; Frost, Jacqueline M; Wong, Andrew K; Merrill, Joan T; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Tikly, Mohammed; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Reveille, John D; Petri, Michelle A; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Kimberly, Robert P; Alarcón, Graciela S; Kamen, Diane L; Gilkeson, Gary S; Vyse, Timothy J; James, Judith A; Gaffney, Patrick M; Moser, Kathy L; Crow, Mary K; Harley, John B.
Ann Rheum Dis; 71(3): 463-8, 2012 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-22088620

OBJECTIVE:

High serum interferon α (IFNα) activity is a heritable risk factor for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Auto-antibodies found in SLE form immune complexes which can stimulate IFNα production by activating endosomal Toll-like receptors and interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), including IRF5. Genetic variation in IRF5 is associated with SLE susceptibility; however, it is unclear how IRF5 functional genetic elements contribute to human disease.

METHODS:

1034 patients with SLE and 989 controls of European ancestry, 555 patients with SLE and 679 controls of African-American ancestry, and 73 patients with SLE of South African ancestry were genotyped at IRF5 polymorphisms, which define major haplotypes. Serum IFNα activity was measured using a functional assay.

RESULTS:

In European ancestry subjects, anti-double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and anti-Ro antibodies were each associated with different haplotypes characterised by a different combination of functional genetic elements (OR>2.56, p<1.9×10(-14) for both). These IRF5 haplotype-auto-antibody associations strongly predicted higher serum IFNα in patients with SLE and explained >70% of the genetic risk of SLE due to IRF5. In African-American patients with SLE a similar relationship between serology and IFNα was observed, although the previously described European ancestry-risk haplotype was present at admixture proportions in African-American subjects and absent in African patients with SLE.

CONCLUSIONS:

The authors define a novel risk haplotype of IRF5 that is associated with anti-dsDNA antibodies and show that risk of SLE due to IRF5 genotype is largely dependent upon particular auto-antibodies. This suggests that auto-antibodies are directly pathogenic in human SLE, resulting in increased IFNα in cooperation with particular combinations of IRF5 functional genetic elements. SLE is a systemic autoimmune disorder affecting multiple organ systems including the skin, musculoskeletal, renal and haematopoietic systems. Humoral autoimmunity is a hallmark of SLE, and patients frequently have circulating auto-antibodies directed against dsDNA, as well as RNA binding proteins (RBP). Anti-RBP autoantibodies include antibodies which recognize Ro, La, Smith (anti-Sm), and ribonucleoprotein (anti-nRNP), collectively referred to as anti-retinol-binding protein). Anti-retinol-binding protein and anti-dsDNA auto-antibodies are rare in the healthy population. These auto-antibodies can be present in sera for years preceding the onset of clinical SLE illness and are likely pathogenic in SLE.
Selo DaSilva