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Performance assessment to investigate the domain specificity of instructional skills among pre-service and in-service teachers of mathematics and economics.

Jeschke, Colin; Kuhn, Christiane; Lindmeier, Anke; Zlatkin-Troitschanskaia, Olga; Saas, Hannes; Heinze, Aiso.
Br J Educ Psychol; 89(3): 538-550, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | Abr 2019 | ID: mdl-30993682
Resumo: BACKGROUND: Key elements of instructional quality include the teacher's ability to immediately react in domain-specific classroom situations. Such skills - defined as action-related skills - can only be validly assessed using authentic representations of real-life teaching practice. However, research has not yet explained how teachers apply domain-specific knowledge for teaching and to what extent action-related skills are transferable from one domain to another. AIMS: Our study aims to examine (1) the relationship between action-related skills, content knowledge, and pedagogical content knowledge, and (2) the domain specificity of action-related skills of (prospective) teachers in the two domains of mathematics and economics. SAMPLE(S): We examined German pre-service and in-service teachers of mathematics (N = 239) and economics (N = 321), including n = 96 (prospective) teachers who teach both subjects. METHODS: Action-related skills in mathematics and economics were measured using video-based performance assessments. Content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge were assessed using established paper-pencil tests. Correlation analyses, linear regressions, and a path model were applied. RESULTS: In mathematics and economics, we find a similar pattern of moderate correlations between action-related skills, content knowledge, and pedagogical content knowledge. Moreover, a significant correlation between action-related skills in mathematics and economics can be explained almost entirely by underlying relations between content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge in both domains. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that action-related skills empirically differ from domain-specific knowledge and should be considered as domain-specific constructs. This indicates that teacher education should not only focus on domain-specific teacher knowledge, but may also provide learning opportunities for action-related skills in each domain.