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Thirst at Work Implies More Than Just Inadequate Facilities for Breaks.

Kottwitz, Maria U; Schnyder, Romy; Berset, Martial; Elfering, Achim.
Appl Psychophysiol Biofeedback; 42(3): 223-234, 2017 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | Jul 2017 | ID: mdl-28676982
Resumo: Early signs of dehydration, such as headaches, are not unusual in the working population. Even slight deficiencies of water intake may have negative effects on both health and performance. However, little is known about work-related fluid intake. We expect the daily experience of interruptions to distract from perceived thirst, resulting in reduced daily fluid intake. This effect may be more pronounced when the workload is generally less predictable due to the assignment of tasks that are beyond the definition of the worker's professional role (unreasonable tasks). Data were gathered from 29 female service employees across five workdays. Multilevel analyses revealed daily work interruptions to be negatively associated with fluid intake, especially when there were frequent unreasonable task-assignments. Results suggest that interruptions at work might reduce daily fluid intake. However, adequate allocation of tasks by managers can protect employees against insufficient drinking.