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Increased Sexually Transmitted Disease Testing Among Sexually Active Persons Receiving Medical Care for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in the United States, 2009-2013.

Mattson, Christine L; Bradley, Heather; Beer, Linda; Johnson, Christopher; Pearson, William S; Shouse, R Luke.
Clin Infect Dis; 64(5): 629-634, 2017 03 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | 2017 | ID: mdl-27940947
Resumo: Background: Current guidelines recommend that all sexually active human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons be tested at least annually for syphilis, chlamydia, and gonorrhea. We examined temporal trends in syphilis, chlamydia, and gonorrhea testing among sexually active HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States during 2009-2013. Methods: Using medical record data from the Medical Monitoring Project, a population-based HIV surveillance system, we assessed the proportion of adults receiving HIV medical care who were tested for syphilis, chlamydia, and gonorrhea in the past 12 months by year and stratified by sex and sexual behavior, age, and race/ethnicity. Results: During 2009-2013, the proportion of sexually active HIV-infected adults receiving medical care who were tested in the past year for all 3 examined sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) increased from 20% to 36% (PTREND < .01). Overall testing for syphilis increased from 55% to 65% (PTREND < .01), and significant increases were noted for the following subgroups: men who have sex with men (58% to 69%), non-Hispanic whites (48% to 64%), and all age groups with the exception of persons aged 18-29 year. Overall testing for chlamydia and gonorrhea increased from 22% to 42% (PTREND < .01), and significant increases were noted for most subgroups. Conclusions: STD testing significantly increased among sexually active HIV-infected adults receiving medical care; however, the majority of persons were not tested for all 3 STDs in 2013. While increased testing indicates progress, testing remained far below recommended guidelines. Our findings suggest enhanced efforts may be warranted to screen all sexually active HIV-infected adults for syphilis, chlamydia, and gonorrhea.