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Usefulness of a systematic approach at listing for vaccine prevention in solid organ transplant candidates.

Blanchard-Rohner, Geraldine; Enriquez, Natalia; Lemaître, Barbara; Cadau, Gianna; Combescure, Christophe; Giostra, Emiliano; Hadaya, Karine; Meyer, Philippe; Gasche-Soccal, Paola M; Berney, Thierry; van Delden, Christian; Siegrist, Claire-Anne.
Am J Transplant; 2018 Aug 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30144276
Solid organ transplant (SOT) candidates may not be immune against potentially vaccine-preventable diseases because of insufficient immunizations and/or limited vaccine responses. We evaluated the impact on vaccine immunity at transplant of a systematic vaccinology workup at listing that included (1) pneumococcal with and without influenza immunization, (2) serology-based vaccine recommendations against measles, varicella, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis A virus, and tetanus, and (3) the documentation of vaccines and serology tests in a national electronic immunization registry (www.myvaccines.ch). Among 219 SOT candidates assessed between January 2014 and November 2015, 54 patients were transplanted during the study. Between listing and transplant, catch-up immunizations increased the patients' immunity from 70% to 87% (hepatitis A virus, P = .008), from 22% to 41% (hepatitis B virus, P = .008), from 77% to 91% (tetanus, P = .03), and from 78% to 98% (Streptococcus pneumoniae, P = .002). Their immunity at transplant was significantly higher against S. pneumoniae (P = .006) and slightly higher against hepatitis A virus (P = .07), but not against hepatitis B virus, than that of 65 SOT recipients transplanted in 2013. This demonstrates the value of a systematic multimodal serology-based approach of immunizations of SOT candidates at listing and the need for optimized strategies to increase their hepatitis B virus vaccine responses.
Selo DaSilva