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Integration of pharmacists into patient-centered medical homes in federally qualified health centers in Texas.

Wong, Shui Ling; Barner, Jamie C; Sucic, Kristina; Nguyen, Michelle; Rascati, Karen L.
J Am Pharm Assoc (2003); 57(3): 375-381, 2017 May - Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28506398

OBJECTIVES:

To describe the integration and implementation of pharmacy services in patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) as adopted by federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) and compare them with usual care (UC).SETTING: Four FQHCs (3 PCMHs, 1 UC) in Austin, TX, that provide care to the underserved populations.PRACTICE DESCRIPTION: Pharmacists have worked under a collaborative practice agreement with internal medicine physicians since 2005. All 4 FQHCs have pharmacists as an integral part of the health care team. Pharmacists have prescriptive authority to initiate and adjust diabetes medications.PRACTICE INNOVATION: The PCMH FQHCs instituted co-visits, where patients see both the physician and the pharmacist on the same day. PCMH pharmacists are routinely proactive in collaborating with physicians regarding medication management, compared with UC in which pharmacists see patients only when referred by a physician.EVALUATION: Four face-to-face, one-on-one semistructured interviews were conducted with pharmacists working in 3 PCMH FQHCs and 1 UC FQHC to compare the implementation of PCMH with emphasis on 1) structure and workflow, 2) pharmacists' roles, and 3) benefits and challenges.

RESULTS:

On co-visit days, the pharmacist may see the patient before or after physician consultation. Pharmacists in 2 of the PCMH facilities proactively screen to identify diabetes patients who may benefit from pharmacist services, although the UC clinic pharmacists see only referred patients. Strengths of the co-visit model include more collaboration with physicians and more patient convenience. Payment that recognizes the value of PCMH is one PCMH principle that is not fully implemented.

CONCLUSION:

PCMH pharmacists in FQHCs were integrated into the workflow to address specific patient needs. Specifically, full-time in-house pharmacists, flexible referral criteria, proactive screening, well defined collaborative practice agreement, and open scheduling were successful strategies for the underserved populations in this study. However, reimbursement plans and provider status for pharmacists should be established to sustain this model of care.
Selo DaSilva