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Positive Effects of a Stress Reduction Program Based on Mindfulness Meditation in Brazilian Nursing Professionals: Qualitative and Quantitative Evaluation.

dos Santos, Teresa Maria; Kozasa, Elisa Harumi; Carmagnani, Isabel Sampaio; Tanaka, Luiza Hiromi; Lacerda, Shirley Silva; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antonio.
Explore (NY); 12(2): 90-9, 2016 Mar-Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26778081
CONTEXT: Mindfulness meditation has been shown to effectively mitigate the negative effects of stress among nursing professionals, but in countries like Brazil, these practices are relatively unexplored.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the effects of a Stress Reduction Program (SRP) including mindfulness and loving kindness meditation among nursing professionals working in a Brazilian hospital setting.

DESIGN:

Pilot study with a mixed model using quantitative and qualitative methods was used to evaluate a group of participants. The quantitative data were analyzed at three different time points: pre-intervention, post-intervention, and follow-up. The qualitative data were analyzed at post-intervention.SETTING: Hospital São Paulo (Brazil).PARTICIPANTS: Sample 13 nursing professionals, including nurses, technicians, and nursing assistants working in a hospital.INTERVENTION: Participants underwent mindfulness and loving kindness meditation during a period of six weeks.INSTRUMENTS: Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS), Self-Compassion Scale (SCS), WHOQOL-BREF quality of life assessment, and Work Stress Scale (WSS). Qualitative data were collected via a group interview following six weeks participation in the SRP.

RESULTS:

The quantitative analyses revealed a significant reduction (P < .05) between pre-intervention and post-intervention scores for perceived stress, burnout, depression, and anxiety (trait). These variables showed no significant differences between post-intervention and follow-up scores. The WHOQOL-BREF revealed significant increase (P < .05) just in the physical and psychological domains at post-intervention scores, which remained at the follow-up. Qualitative results showed improvement in the reactivity to inner experience; a more attentive perception of internal and external experiences; greater attention and awareness of actions and attitudes at every moment; and a positive influence of the SRP in nursing activities.
Selo DaSilva