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Pharmacists on primary care teams: Effect on antihypertensive medication management in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Omran, Dima; Majumdar, Sumit R; Johnson, Jeffrey A; Tsuyuki, Ross T; Lewanczuk, Richard Z; Guirguis, Lisa M; Makowsky, Mark; Simpson, Scot H.
J Am Pharm Assoc (2003); 55(3): 265-8, 2015 May-Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25909463

OBJECTIVE:

To identify which activities produced a significant improvement in blood pressure control in patients with type 2 diabetes when pharmacists were added to primary care teams.

METHODS:

This prespecified, secondary analysis evaluated medication management data from a randomized controlled trial. The primary outcome was a change in treatment, defined as addition, dosage increase, or switching of an antihypertensive medication during the 1-year study period. The secondary outcome was a change in antihypertensive medication adherence using the medication possession ratio (MPR).

RESULTS:

The 200 evaluable trial patients had a mean age of 59 (SD, 11) years, 44% were men, and mean blood pressure was 130 (SD, 16)/74 (SD, 10) mm Hg at baseline. Treatment changes occurred in 45 (42%) of 107 patients in the intervention group and 24 (26%) of 93 patients in the control group (RR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.08-2.46). Addition of a new medication was the most common type of change, occurring in 34 (32%) patients in the intervention group and 17 (18%) patients in the control group (P = 0.029). Adherence to antihypertensive medication was high at baseline (MPR, 93%). Although medication adherence improved in the intervention group (MPR, 97%) and declined in the control group (MPR, 91%), the difference between groups was not significant (P = 0.21).

CONCLUSION:

The observed improvement in blood pressure control when pharmacists were added to primary care teams was likely achieved through antihypertensive treatment changes and not through improvements in antihypertensive medication adherence.
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