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Proteomic analysis of human dental cementum and alveolar bone.

Salmon, Cristiane R; Tomazela, Daniela M; Ruiz, Karina Gonzales Silvério; Foster, Brian L; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Sallum, Enilson Antonio; Somerman, Martha J; Nociti, Francisco H.
J Proteomics; 91: 544-55, 2013 Oct 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24007660
UNLABELLED: Dental cementum (DC) is a bone-like tissue covering the tooth root and responsible for attaching the tooth to the alveolar bone (AB) via the periodontal ligament (PDL). Studies have unsuccessfully tried to identify factors specific to DC versus AB, in an effort to better understand DC development and regeneration. The present study aimed to use matched human DC and AB samples (n=7) to generate their proteomes for comparative analysis. Bone samples were harvested from tooth extraction sites, whereas DC samples were obtained from the apical root portion of extracted third molars. Samples were denatured, followed by protein extraction reduction, alkylation and digestion for analysis by nanoAcquity HPLC system and LTQ-FT Ultra. Data analysis demonstrated that a total of 318 proteins were identified in AB and DC. In addition to shared proteins between these tissues, 105 and 83 proteins exclusive to AB or DC were identified, respectively. This is the first report analyzing the proteomic composition of human DC matrix and identifying putative unique and enriched proteins in comparison to alveolar bone. These findings may provide novel insights into developmental differences between DC and AB, and identify candidate biomarkers that may lead to more efficient and predictable therapies for periodontal regeneration. BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Periodontal disease is a highly prevalent disease affecting the world population, which involves breakdown of the tooth supporting tissues, the periodontal ligament, alveolar bone, and dental cementum. The lack of knowledge on specific factors that differentiate alveolar bone and dental cementum limits the development of more efficient and predictable reconstructive therapies. In order to better understand cementum development and potentially identify factors to improve therapeutic outcomes, we took the unique approach of using matched patient samples of dental cementum and alveolar bone to generate and compare a proteome list for each tissue. A potential biomarker for dental cementum was identified, superoxide dismutase 3 (SOD3), which is found in cementum and cementum-associated cells in mouse, pig, and human tissues. These findings may provide novel insights into developmental differences between alveolar bone and dental cementum, and represent the basis for improved and more predictable therapies.
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